Personal Activity Tracker for Fox and Badger Employees Background: You work in the HR department for Fox and Badger, an online outdoor store and you have

Personal Activity Tracker for Fox and Badger Employees Background:

You work in the HR department for Fox and Badger, an online outdoor store and you have many co-workers who spend most of their day sitting while they deal with online orders or answer customer questions.So although you are an outdoor company, not all of your employees are super fit. You have read that other companies have given their employees personal activity trackers to encourage them to engage in a more active lifestyle, which may benefit the employees in terms of their health and may benefit the company in terms of healthier employees who may need less time off and be more productive, and perhaps eventually may lead to lower costs for health care or at least fewer increases in costs. Therefore, you will write a short informal proposal to the CEO in which you propose that your company should equip each employee with a personal activity tracker.

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Your proposal has the following components in this order:

Memo Header & clear subject line that catches reader’s attention and conveys the benefit of your solution
An Executive Summary: this first paragraph contains the following: a buffer, the problem, the solution, the main reason for investing in the personal activity trackers, and the budget involved.An executive summary, see pages 407-408 allows a reader to read only that paragraph and decide whether he or she needs to keep reading).
Description of the Problem: Use sufficient detail to persuade readers that inactivity during the day at work causes a number of problem (use sources to document the types of problems being inactive at work can lead to.Consider finding reputable sources on how sitting all day can lead to cardiovascular disease for example).
Solution:Describe your solution and then follow this description with at least three arguments for your proposal to give employees personal activity trackers. See page 285 for employing logic and emotion as you develop reasons. Support your arguments for your proposal with research (e.g. evidence from various studies or case histories or articles to show the positive benefits of giving employees these devices
Now Give Specific Details about the Solution:
Budget Information: An estimate of the total cost of the personal activity trackers for your company. You must explain the budget items in detail. If you are asking someone to give you money or asking them to implement something that will require money, you need to justify the expense and explain how you arrived at the amounts you did. Are there any other expenses in addition to the trackers themselves
Objection and Refutation:You should anticipate at least one objection to your proposal and refute it.Read the sources I have given you and you will find possible objections employees and employers have.
A conclusion persuasively restating your request and the main reason and explain how you can be contacted should the VP want to discuss this in person.
Explain the ideal qualities a personal activity tracker should have
Show how the brand you recommend meets these ideals
Consider including a comparison of the cost of the brand and features you recommend to other other brands on the market
Include a time frame (how long it will take to implement your plan)

Sources: Use at least three sources in addition the articles I have linked to this assignment sheet. You may certainly use more however. I’d suggest you use following databases: ABI Inform, Academic Search Premier and you may use Google but make sure the sources you find come from respected publications.

Sources need to be documented in the text by telling your reader who the writer is and his or her expertise:According to New York Times health writer John Doe (2017), ……., and a list of references needs to be included. Just putting someone’s name in parentheses tells me nothing about the credibility of the writer.And use quotations.

Use APA style of documentation.You may of course also use testimony if you know of users who have these activity trackers

You Attitude: You want to pay special attention to creating a “you attitude” so that your reader will be motivated to provide funding for the program. Since you are writing to the CEO, consider what she or he cares about.

Report Format:

Length: 3-5 pages using single space typing and blank lines between paragraphs excluding the separate reference page

please do simple writing!!! Short Informal Proposal
Review chap 11
Read the article at the end of this assignment sheet to find out why companies are giving
employees Fitbits.
Then read the article from the Financial Times that follows that raises some negative reactions to
this idea.
Look at the following example: Figure 11.14 “Internal Proposal” on pp. 349-351
Background:
You work in the HR department for Fox and Badger, an online outdoor store and you have many
co-workers who spend most of their day sitting while they deal with online orders or answer
customer questions. So although you are an outdoor company, not all of your employees are
super fit. You have read that other companies have given their employees personal activity
trackers to encourage them to engage in a more active lifestyle, which may benefit the employees
in terms of their health and may benefit the company in terms of healthier employees who may
need less time off and be more productive, and perhaps eventually may lead to lower costs for
health care or at least fewer increases in costs. Therefore, you will write a short informal proposal
to the CEO in which you propose that your company should equip each employee with a personal
activity tracker.
Your proposal has the following components in this order:
1. Memo Header & clear subject line that catches reader’s attention and conveys the benefit
of your solution
2. An Executive Summary: this first paragraph contains the following: a buffer, the problem,
the solution, the main reason for investing in the personal activity trackers, and the budget
involved. An executive summary, see pages 407-408 allows a reader to read only that
paragraph and decide whether he or she needs to keep reading).
3. Description of the Problem: Use sufficient detail to persuade readers that inactivity
during the day at work causes a number of problem (use sources to document the types of
problems being inactive at work can lead to. Consider finding reputable sources on how
sitting all day can lead to cardiovascular disease for example).
4. Solution: Describe your solution and then follow this description with at least three
arguments for your proposal to give employees personal activity trackers. See page 285
for employing logic and emotion as you develop reasons. Support your arguments for
your proposal with research (e.g. evidence from various studies or case histories or
articles to show the positive benefits of giving employees these devices
5. Now Give Specific Details about the Solution:
•
Explain the ideal qualities a personal activity tracker should have
•
Show how the brand you recommend meets these ideals
•
Consider including a comparison of the cost of the brand and features you recommend to
other other brands on the market
•
Include a time frame (how long it will take to implement your plan)
6. Budget Information: An estimate of the total cost of the personal activity trackers for your
company. You must explain the budget items in detail. If you are asking someone to give
you money or asking them to implement something that will require money, you need to
justify the expense and explain how you arrived at the amounts you did. Are there any other
expenses in addition to the trackers themselves
7. Objection and Refutation: You should anticipate at least one objection to your proposal
and refute it. Read the sources I have given you and you will find possible objections
employees and employers have.
8. A conclusion persuasively restating your request and the main reason and explain how
you can be contacted should the VP want to discuss this in person.
Sources: Use at least three sources in addition the articles I have linked to this assignment sheet.
You may certainly use more however. I’d suggest you use following databases: ABI Inform,
Academic Search Premier and you may use Google but make sure the sources you find come from
respected publications.
Sources need to be documented in the text by telling your reader who the writer is and his or her
expertise: According to New York Times health writer John Doe (2017), ……., and a list of
references needs to be included. Just putting someone’s name in parentheses tells me nothing
about the credibility of the writer. And use quotations.
Use APA style of documentation. You may of course also use testimony if you know of users
who have these activity trackers
You Attitude: You want to pay special attention to creating a “you attitude” so that your reader will
be motivated to provide funding for the program. Since you are writing to the CEO, consider
what she or he cares about.
Report Format:
Length: 3-5 pages using single space typing and blank lines between paragraphs excluding
the separate reference page
The purpose of your formatting is to make your argument as understandable as possible.
Therefore it is of vital importance to create a visually appealing document that allows the reader
to easily skim the document for essential information. Do not hesitate to experiment with pictures,
graphs, tables, different fonts, type sizes, columns, bulleted lists, etc. as ways to convey
information persuasively
Additional Considerations:
As you complete your report, you will want to pay close attention to what Bovee and Thill discuss in
Chapters 11 and 12. In particular, you’ll want to consider the following material:
In the Table 11.1 (p. 322), you see the difference between a problem statement and a purpose
statement. While your thinking about the project will probably start with a problem statement, you
will need to create a statement of purpose that presents both what you are going to write about
(the problem) AND why you are writing the report (what you want to happen). If you do not have a
clear sense of your purpose, it is difficult to write an effective report since “effective” means
achieving a specific purpose.
Remember that for your report to be effective and persuasive, you need to support your claims with
evidence that your audience will value. So find good sources and use them well.
The Washington Post
Feb 16 2019
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/with-fitness-trackers-in-the-workplacebosses-can-monitor-your-every-step–and-possibly-more/2019/02/15/75ee0848-2a45-11e9-b011d8500644dc98_story.html?utm_term=.31ac9cbc8095
With fitness trackers in the workplace, bosses can
monitor your every step — and possibly more
By Christopher Rowland
IRVING, Texas — On his 21st day back at work after a heart attack and triple bypass
surgery, Chris Zubko received a call from the main office. Through an app on his
phone, his boss was literally monitoring every step of Zubko’s recovery.
“Man! I noticed your steps have picked up,’’ gushed Wayne Gono, 65, whose family
operates Regal Plastics, a small fabrication business with satellite shops around Texas.
“You used to be under 2,000, now you’re over 6,000.
Two times you worked out this week. Good!’’
Welcome to a rapidly growing phenomenon in the workplace: constant health
surveillance.
A digital fitness tracker strapped to Zubko’s wrist sends a tally of his daily
movements, via the company’s UnitedHealth Group insurance account, to an app on
his boss’s phone. While some employees might find this real-time feedback intrusive,
Zubko, 51, said he is unfazed.
“He’s a real motivator,’’ Zubko said after getting off the phone with Gono.
Devices worn on employees’ bodies are an increasingly valuable source of workforce
health intelligence for employers and insurance companies. It’s fueling a boom in the
use of wrist-borne health and fitness monitors such as those made by Fitbit, Garmin
and Apple.
But the volume of highly sensitive health data scooped up from individual employees
is exploding, too, raising privacy concerns and adding a new dimension to the
relationship of workers and their employers. Often the information is not covered by
federal rules that protect health records from disclosure. And when it’s combined with
data such as credit scores, employees are giving up more insights about themselves
than they realize.
The ever-more-sophisticated devices are measuring not just steps and distance
walked but also the hours a worker spends in a sedentary state, 24/7 heart rate, and
sleep duration and quality.
The goal is to help people get and stay fit and save on health-care costs, although
evidence is mixed at best about whether the approach works. An employee who
barely budges from their desk could be next in line for a medical intervention. That
could come from a call center run by Fitbit or a notification from Aetna, which recently
announced a new health-monitoring program using Apple watches.
Or, at a small employer such as Regal Plastics, it could come straight from the boss
you’ve known for almost 25 years.
Gono said he had been using Zubko’s steps data to push the employee, who handles
accounting and purchasing at the Austin office, even before his health crisis in
December.
“He just wasn’t doing anything’’ when it came to exercise, Gono said. “You could tell
because he would get less than 2,000 steps every day. He was one of the ones that I
personally always challenged.’’
Now, since his heart attack, “everybody’s pushing this guy,’’ Gono added. “We do that
with everybody, especially the ones who don’t seem to be exercising.’’
In general, employees in such programs voluntarily sign up for digital health
monitoring. They are lured by cash, reduced premiums, or reimbursements for copayments and deductibles, which have skyrocketed for many people with insurance.
The devices are handed out free or discounted.
Their employers and insurance companies are hungry for the resulting explosion of
information about their workers. Around 20 percent of employers who offer health
insurance collected data last year from their employees’ wearable devices, up from 14
percent in 2017, according to an annual survey conducted by the Kaiser Family
Foundation.
Annual sales of wearable devices for use in company wellness programs will grow to
18 million in 2023 in the United States, according to tech consulting firm ABI
Research.
Fitbit is moving aggressively to sign up companies. It added a call service that will
reach out to individual workers — via text messages and phone calls — whose data
shows they are falling short of their fitness goals. It’s part of a concerted effort to
improve the health of entire workforces.
“Sustained behavior change is really the focus,’’ said Adam Pellegrini, senior vice
president of Fitbit Health Solutions. “Through the system, we can actually see who is
not hitting their goals, who is not adhering to that action plan.’’
But privacy and workforce specialists warn the data could be abused to favor the
healthiest employees while punishing or stigmatizing those who are less healthy, or
who show signs of unhealthy behavior such as heavy drinking or drug use.
“The more that employers know about their employees’ lives, especially outside the
workplace, off-duty hours, the more potential control or effects they have on their
lives in the first place,’’ said Lee Tien, a senior staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier
Foundation, a nonprofit organization that advocates for consumer privacy.
“It’s quite possible,’’ he said, “there will be effects on whether you are retained,
promoted, demoted — who is first to be laid off.’’
Cash rewards for steps
The vibe at Regal Plastics seems more paternalistic than punitive.
The privately held family firm, headquartered among Irving’s office parks and
warehouses near the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, has 100 employees at
several locations around Texas. The company builds desks, outdoor canopies, display
cases, stage sets, pet carriers, bulletproof barriers and just about anything else a
business or contractor might need.
It’s led by Wayne Gono, and his wife, Patsy, whose father founded the business in
1970. Patsy is the company’s president. Wayne has taken the title of visionary/chief
networking officer and has passed the title of chief executive to the couple’s son,
Chad, 36, the third generation to take the reins. The company never gave any thought
to the fitness of its employees, Wayne Gono said, until a few years ago, when it
offered its workers a chance to join a UnitedHealth program that distributed basic Trio
wrist devices that measure steps.
Enrollees in the program, called UnitedHealthcare Motion, get up to $1,000 a year if
they hit certain goals, such as 10,000 steps in a day, 3,000 of those steps within 30
minutes, and 500 steps at intervals throughout the day. The money reimburses
health-plan enrollees for prescription co-pays and other payments under their
deductibles.
Gono said he has not seen evidence the program is saving the business money on
premiums. But he says it stands to reason that healthier employees will be better for
the bottom line — eventually. Regal Plastics employees who wear the devices (many
don’t, especially younger people who don’t have many medical expenses) said they
like them.
Gono’s UnitedHealth app reveals a list of the top performers. Ronald “Hot Rod’’
Wilborn, 47, has an advantage over many of his colleagues and consistently ranks
near the top. His job, using precision machines to turn sheet plastic into useful things,
requires him to walk multiple round trips from the shop to the warehouse. On a recent
day, one round trip clocked at 386 steps. He frequently amasses more than 20,000
steps a day. He gets a small check every quarter from UnitedHealth.
“The more I walk, the more I get,’’ Wilborn said.
Another employee whom Gono said he personally challenged to lose weight, Eddie
Watson, 46, works in the Irving office as a sales representative. He has lost 40
pounds but has hit a plateau and is looking for ways to lose 20 more. He has a 6year-old daughter and takes her to the park near his house to accumulate steps, he
said.
During an interview in the Regal break room, Watson munched from a plate of
guacamole and greens. Exercise surveillance is just part of a broader culture shift at
Regal aimed at employee well-being, including introduction of standing desks, music
during working hours, and graphics at work stations that show each person’s working
style and preferences.
As part of the changing culture, Regal’s leaders encouraged employees to “clean up
your life, too,’’ Watson said. “That kind of planted the seeds.’’
Now, Watson said he examines every aspect of his diet through a prism of personal
health, for example: “I can’t drink this soda, because there’s no place for it in my
body.’’ Without encouragement from his employer, he added, none of this would have
happened.
One of the few millennials with a step-tracker on his wrist at Regal was Travis Lee, a
thin, 29-year-old purchasing agent. He has few medical expenses, so he doesn’t even
earn money from UnitedHealth for hitting step goals. But on Black Friday last year, he
upgraded to a Fitbit Charge 2 because he likes monitoring his steps, sleep and heart
rate. He synced it to his UnitedHealth account so he still shows up on Gono’s app.
He doesn’t worry too much about where his data goes, or how it is used.
“It’s part of the generation. We’re used to it,’’ Lee said. “We kind of know we’re giving
something up to use it.’’
Where is the data going?
Once health and fitness data leaves an employee’s wrist, it enters a digital realm that
critics say is loosely regulated.
The information streams to an app on the worker’s phone, and from there to several
possible places: the manufacturer of the device, the health insurance company, the
employer or a wellness-plan administrator — or all of them.
Because the wearer of the device is voluntarily giving up data, companies enjoy
greater legal leeway in how it is used.
The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association provides one example. The association, which
represents Blue Cross health plans across the country, offers a Blue365 wellness
monitoring program, which includes member discounts to buy Fitbit devices. When
they sign up for the Fitbit app, members can “opt-in’’ to have their information
disclosed from Fitbit to their Blue Cross plan and their employer.
Fitbit’s privacy policy, meanwhile, which a new user can read when they set up their
app, says Fitbit shares information to corporate affiliates, service providers and
unspecified “other partners.’’
“Fitbit is committed to protecting consumer privacy and putting users in control of
their personal data,’’ the company said in response to questions from The Washington
Post. “Fitbit believes that corporate wellness programs should always be inclusive,
voluntary and should protect the privacy of the people they are aimed to serve.’’
Aetna, which is part of CVS Health, last month announced a new wellness program
featuring Apple watches. It said it is up to users to decide what data they want to
share.
UnitedHealth said employers typically have access to “de-identified’’ employee data.
But there are exceptions. “In some instances, employers may receive certain
additional information for plan administrative purposes,’’ UnitedHealth said. (At Regal
Plastics, Gono’s app shows employees identified by unique handles). Privacy and data
specialists say sharing of potentially sensitive health and fitness data is becoming
widespread.
Google, Amazon and Apple are rapidly expanding their ability to conduct health
analysis based on data shared with them, said Sanket Shah, a senior director at Blue
Health Intelligence, which provides workforce health analytics for employers in Blue
Cross Blue Shield insurance networks.
“They’re basically taking all these troves of data, and starting to provide a holistic
view of population health and individual health,’’ Shah said. “It’s handle with care. The
data is very sensitive, and if it falls into the wrong hands, it could be devastating.’’
Many consumers are under the mistaken belief that all health data they share is
required by law to be kept private under a federal law called HIPAA, the Health
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. The law prohibits doctors, hospitals and
insurance companies from disclosing personal health information.
But if an employee voluntarily gives health data to an employer or a company such as
Fitbit or Apple — entities that are not covered by HIPPA’s rules — those restrictions on
disclosure don’t apply, said Joe Jerome, a policy lawyer at the Center for Democracy &
Technology, a nonprofit in Washington. The center is urging federal policymakers to
tighten up the rules.
“There’s gaps everywhere,’’ Jerome said.
Real-time information from wearable devices is crunched together with information
about past doctors visits and hospitalizations to get a health snapshot of employees.
Sleep monitoring has especially profound implications. Poor sleep can be a key
indicator of depression, substance abuse or other mental disturbances. Overweight
insomniacs, as measured in this new world, for example, will stand out faster as
potentially costly health insurance risks.
Some companies also add information from outside the health system — social
predictors of health such as credit scores and whether someone lives alone — to come
up with individual risk forecasts.
“The Fitbit or Apple Watch applications . . . may yield clues to things about you that
you are not even aware of, or not ready for other people to know,’’ said Electronic
Frontier’s Tien. “Individuals and consumers who are buying these devices don’t
understand that is a potential consequence.’’
The Financial Times
https://www.ft.com/content/9f6f0512-452f-11e6-9b66-0712b3873ae1
Technology wearables are in workplace health vogue
While technology offers tantalising opportunitie…
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